Breeding Boer Does at Cotton Bean Boer Goat Farm

Click on "See more details" to view details of the nanny goat

I was searching for some mature boer does to add to the farm in January 2020. We found a farm with 6 beautiful girls born in July 2017 that they wanted to rehome due to getting out of goats.  We took a drive to Knoxville, TN to meet them. They were healthy but needed some copper bolus and a few extra groceries since they were on pasture only in the dead of winter. We decided to add them to the farm and introduced them to the good life with all the hay they can eat.


We began the process of trying to win them over. One of the full red boer does came up and took an animal cracker from me. Quickly 2 more joined her. The other 3 just watched from a distance. I introduced fig newton’s and had 5 of them eating them by the end of the week.  This was important because I needed to copper bolus them desperately. We gave them a mineral block and they quickly ate it down to nothing. They are starting to fill out nicely and their body condition is improving daily. 

Babies goat are here: Looks like a few of the girls were indeed bred when they came to our Goat Farm. They have had some of the most beautiful baby goats with several spotted / dappled bucklings. We are still hoping the dark red / brown doe is pregnant by our Muffin Man. We will know in a few weeks. 

Fast Forward:  After a few weeks we introduced Muffin Man, our 100% registered boer buck to the pasture. We are hoping when they go in heat they will like Muffin Man enough to stand for him. Will we have 2020 babies? Stay tuned!

July 2020 Evie one of our Knoxville Boer nanny's gave birth to a beautiful white with dark brown head boer buckling. She is a great first time mom. Although, I did think she was going to at least have twins, maybe even triplets.

Knoxville Boer Does

We added 5 Boer Nanny's to our Boer Breeding program here at the goat farm. We traveled all the way to Knoxville, TN to pick them up.

August 2020: Pita, our registered Boer doe, continues to thrive and grow here at Cotton Bean Boer Goat farm in Mt. Pleasant, NC.​

Let's first start with her name, PITA! What does it stand for you may be asking yourself.....  Since you wanted to know, Pain in the A**. ​

Here is her story! We got her Mom, Lillith, when she was pregnant with only 10 days to go. 20 days later this boer nanny finally delivered twin baby goats. The boy was not alive when I found PITA outside the birthing pen at 2 am talking to her Nanny on the other side of the wood panel. This was just a sign of things to come. lol 

This beautiful traditional Boer Doe holds such a special place in our hearts here at Cotton Bean Farms. We consider ourselves so blessed to be able to watch her grow and thrive. It's hard to believe that she is only 4 months old. We are looking forward to the next 15 years with Pita goat!

Pita Registered Boer Doeling

Pita is one of my favorite Boer does. I am sure it is because we fought so hard to keep her alive when she was born. This is one of the reasons we named her Pita. Can you guess what is stands for? Read more to find out the answer!

May 2020: Daffy our traditional colored Boer Nanny goat had twins this spring. She had a doeling and a buckling.​ She is a wonderful Nanny Goat and her baby goat twins are stuck up. The twins are part of the "Mean goat" club. 

Details about Daffy: Let’s talk about Daffodil one of our twin boer doelings we picked her and her sister up in December 2019 as bottle babies. The farmer we got them from told us he had too many boer bottle babies to handle. Although, I think he knew they had pneumonia and was happy to let them be someone else’s problem. We drove home to the farm with them in the back of our jeep. We thought we had contained them in a crate but they quickly escaped. They moved to the front of the jeep so they could nibble our ears and give us kisses the entire way home.  I gave them some supportive care and penicillin until we could get them to the vet first thing Monday morning.  We nursed them to health and they have matured into beautiful does.​​

After they were healed up they spent some time hanging out with our Mini Nubian buckling who was also a bottle baby. They were spunky young does with a lot of energy. It was so much fun to watch them run and bounce between the bug rocks around the farm.​

Daffodil on the other hand is more reserved than her twin doe sister. She watches from a distance and comes over occasionally for attention.

Daffy Commercial Boer Doe

Daffy was a bottle baby goat raised at Cotton Bean Goat Farm in Winter of 2019. This is one of my favorite pictures of a very pregnant Daffy. I kept waiting for her to pop! I spent so much time waiting on her to kid. She is well aware of what DOE code is and practices it.

May 2020: Daisy had a single boy this spring and he is built like a tank. This ​means our bottle baby's are all grown up and not they are officially Nanny goats!​ Daisy is the most wonderful goat mom and she is super sweet!

Let’s talk about Daisy. She is one of our twin boer doelings we picked up in December 2019 as bottle babies. The farmer we got them from told us he had too many boer bottle babies to handle. Although, I think he knew they had pneumonia and was happy to let them be someone else’s problem. We drove home with them in the back of our jeep. We thought we had contained them in a crate but they quickly escaped. They moved to the front of the jeep so they could nibble our ears and give us kisses the entire way home.  I gave them some supportive care and penicillin until we could get them to the vet first thing Monday morning. We nursed them to health and they have matured into beautiful does.

Note: Find a good goat vet before you get goats! After they were healed up they spent some time hanging out with our Mini Nubian buckling who was also a bottle baby.  They were spunky young girls with a lot of energy. It was so much fun to watch them run and bounce between the bug rocks around the farm.

Daisy is super friendly and loves attention. She often nibbles at my clothes and will rub her head against the back of my legs until I give her attention.

Daisy Commercial Boer Doe

Daisy was a bottle baby goat here at Cotton Bean Goat Farm and she is super sweet! She will follow me around the goat pasture until I take the time to stop and love on her.

Dutchess came from the same farm as Red Man our boer buck. She is a beautiful, registered boer doe, with a traditional white body and a red head. We got her when she was weaned from her Dam. She was shy for a very long time. I don’t think I got to touch her for at least 3 months. After a lot of work, I finally won her over with animal crackers! I am so happy to announce we are now good friends. I think she may actually like humans now! She also has a beautiful smile and she loves to climb on everything. If any of my boer goats climb a tree, Dutchess will be the first one up it. She reminded my husband of royalty due to the way she carried herself so he choose to name her Dutchess.  I suppose that makes her the Dutchess of Cotton Bean but please don't tell our other does!  Now to find her a Duke…...

Dutchess Registered Boer Doe

This Boer Doe is always up for adventure. She is happiest climbing on things.

Our little beautiful registered Dottie boer doe was a Valentine baby, 2/14/ 2019. She is a beautiful red and white dappled boer doeling with Max Boer lineage. We picked this beautiful specimen of a boer goat up at a NC Boer Goat auction.  It was love at first sight for us. When we got her home we could quickly tell she had never had human contact. This made it hard to do general hoof maintenance or even check a famacha on this sweet little boer goat. Not to mention, the trama it caused having to chase her down to do any of these things. I would sit with her for hours on end. I tried bribing her with treats and that didn’t work. After a few weeks we could tell she had a worm load, she wasn’t really eating and body her condition was quickly headed to a bad place.  At this point she had no choice but to be touched.  I was forced to hold her and treat her. I would stuff a small piece of fig newton in her mouth, love on her for a few minutes and sit with her afterwards. I brought her warm molasses water a few times a day and she began to come over and drink it with me standing beside her. This was HUGE for her! I gave her alpha, red cell, pro bios, spinach, carrots and fresh oranges daily. I refused to loose my Dottie girl! After weeks of this regimen and lots of prayers she was on the mend. Her body condition was improving and she decided we could be friends. I am happy to report she now loves me as much as I love her!  I am looking forward to breeding her in 2020 and meeting her beautiful kids. ​

Note: Raising goats is NOT easy despite what people will tell you. Invest time learning about nutrition, signs of worms and get to know your goats. You will need a goat medical closet on hand and you will need to become a part time vet. If something is off with your goat, take their temperature and check their famacha.  Our first vet didn't know anything about supportive care so over time I learned by joining forums and talking to other more experienced goat farmers.  If we had gotten her when we started in goats I would have lost this beautiful soul just because I didn't know what to do and often times the vet doesn't know!

Dottie Registered Boer Doe

Dottie is our sweet and shy registered Boer doe! Look at her markings! Be sure to read her story, we almost lost her!

This beautiful registered boer doe came from the same farm as our registered boer doe Dutchess and our 100% registered buck Red Man.  She was born in October of 2018.  We got her at 9 months old, around July of 2019.  This boer doe was not fond of people unless you had grain.  If you have grain for this girl she is your new best friend!  When we brought her home she was turned out into a pasture so I didn’t have a chance to win her over.​

Update February 2020: She had a beautiful set of red boer twins. Both the girl and boy baby goats are red with a white belt!​

Fast forward 1/2020: She is now expecting her first babies. This has really changed her temperament. She allows me to rub her, she greets me at the gate so I spoil her with treats.  I guess when you are expecting doelings or bucklings you get special treatment, right? We are praying for an easy delivery for this sweet lady! Oh and think PINK….

Mable Registered Boer Doe

Mable is our beautiful 100% registered Boer Nanny! She is solid red in color.

July 2020: No, I didn't know she was pregnant. I came out to see a beautiful black headed boer doeling by her side.  We thought she had twins but it turned out that our red boer Nanny also had a black headed boer baby the same night. ​

Let’s talk about Goat Love at first sight. It happened in January 2020 for me. Anyone who knows me, knows I love Mini Nubian's. There was something about this boer doe. I laid eyes on her and knew that I wanted her to join our breeding plan and farm family here at Cotton Bean Goat Farm. 

As god would have it, I was supposed to get her to save her.  She was part of the "Mean Goat Girl" club. I couldn't touch her and she would run as far away as she could go when I entered the pasture. We lost her sister to worm load because we couldn't get our hands on her. We unknowingly purchased them worm loaded.  When she went down I was able to catch Laverne. I quarantined her in a goat birthing pen to treat her worm load and began anemia support. She got red cell daily, alfalfa hay, vitamin B, pro bios, etc. Day by day she got better and I began to spoil her with treats. I gave her animal crackers, carrots, spinach, oranges, bananas and any other veggie I had in the house. She had a secret of course, she was pregnant during this time. I'm grateful I didn't know because in the beginning we had to man handle her to treat her.  Had I know she was expecting baby goats I may have let a few anemia support treatments go when she fought me.

She is still a little standoffish but will let me rub her nose and take treats. This is why it is important to be able to handle your goats. It's hard to get a famacha on them when you can't touch them. It's also hard to hold them for baby goats when a first time doe kids if she runs and fights you. 

The hardest thing about being a self proclaimed Goat Moma is loosing a goat. It doesn't matter why you loose them, they still take a piece of your heart with them.  I have studied and learned as much as I can. I offer to help and mentor other goat owners so they don't have to learn the hard way. It's hard to take care of them if you can't touch them! I would pay extra for a socialized goat!​

Note: Find a good goat vet before you get goats!

Laverne Commercial Boer Nanny Goat

This is our beautiful Black Headed Boer Doe.I saw a picture of her and immediately fell in love. I know she was part of the "Mean girl goat club",

She is very shy and is starting to slowly trust me. I am able to walk within a few feet of her and stoop down for her to sometimes come close enough for a neck rub. I will take it!

When I first met Lilith I thought oh my she could easily kill me if she wanted to. I am not easily intimidated but she is HUGE. Lucky for me her sweet personality is HUGE too! 

​She was very pregnant and due in 10 days. I can't tell you how much she weighed. She was at a new goat farm and very upset to be locked up in a kidding stall. We didn't know how she would react to the rest of the boer herd and we always quarantine new does, even show goats. It took her about an hour to bend a brand new pasture gate in half. I tried to make friends with her but she was not having it. She also stopped eating her grain and she was due in only 10 days. I even went back to the other goat farm 3 hours away and got a bag of "her" feed. This didn't help. I went out and checked on her often and 21 days later she kidded. 

This lovely Boer Nanny has some African lines in her lineage.

Update Feb 2020: x I will be totally honest, I was very hesitant to step in her birthing stall when I found out that she had delivered. I noticed one of the twins was not moving. At this point my "save the baby goat" attitude kicked in and I was going to help even if she killed me. I quickly opened the pasture gate and entered her goat kidding stall and went over to the baby. I think he was still born and had already passed when I found them. She had a beautiful traditional colored Doeling, who of course somehow managed to escaped and was waiting on the other side of the pen. It was so sweet to hear Lilith sweetly talking to her. This was only the beginning of our journey to save Pita goat.

Lilith Registered Boer Doe

Lillith - Registered
Boer Doe / Nanny Goat

Our little beautiful registered Dottie boer doe was a Valentine baby, 2/14/ 2019. She is a beautiful red and white dappled boer doeling with Max Boer lineage. We picked this beautiful specimen of a boer goat up at a NC Boer Goat auction.  It was love at first sight for us. When we got her home we could quickly tell she had never had human contact. This made it hard to do general hoof maintenance or even check a famacha on this sweet little boer goat. Not to mention, the trama it caused having to chase her down to do any of these things. I would sit with her for hours on end. I tried bribing her with treats and that didn’t work. After a few weeks we could tell she had a worm load, she wasn’t really eating and body her condition was quickly headed to a bad place.  At this point she had no choice but to be touched.  I was forced to hold her and treat her. I would stuff a small piece of fig newton in her mouth, love on her for a few minutes and sit with her afterwards. I brought her warm molasses water a few times a day and she began to come over and drink it with me standing beside her. This was HUGE for her! I gave her alpha, red cell, pro bios, spinach, carrots and fresh oranges daily. I refused to loose my Dottie girl! After weeks of this regimen and lots of prayers she was on the mend. Her body condition was improving and she decided we could be friends. I am happy to report she now loves me as much as I love her!  I am looking forward to breeding her in 2020 and meeting her beautiful kids. 

Note: Raising goats is NOT easy despite what people will tell you. Invest time learning about nutrition, signs of worms and get to know your goats. You will need a goat medical closet on hand and you will need to become a part time vet. If something is off with your goat, take their temperature and check their famacha.  Our first vet didn't know anything about supportive care so over time I learned by joining forums and talking to other more experienced goat farmers.  If we had gotten her when we started in goats I would have lost this beautiful soul just because I didn't know what to do and often times the vet doesn't know!

Dottie Commerical Boer Doe

Dottie is our commercial spotted Boer Nanny. When we got her she was sick so it took some work but look at her now!

Hazel is the daughter of Chesnut.  We adopted this famiuy of Boer goats in Jan of 2020.

Hazel Commerical Boer Doe

Hazel is our Commerical Boer Doe. She is sweet but shy and will often come up for love.

Chesnut is the mother of Hazel our Boer Doe and she is now a grandmother. It is exciting to watch our Boer does grow up and mature on the farm. A goats bond to their baby goats continue to adulthood.

Hazel who was almost 2 years old spent every night close to Chesnut. Most nights they are huddled together until Chesnut gave birth to Coconut , "coco" and Mac back in March. At this point she started caring for her new baby goats. We also found out that Hazel was pregnant. We didn't actually know this until she gave birth. Sometimes you don't know a goat is pregnant when they pasture breed. Being a first time mom also helps cover this up because they don't always develop a udder prior to birthing.

Chesnut Commerical Boer Doe

Chesnut is our Commercial Boer Nanny goat / doe. You can handle her but she isn't going to run up for love. Not all goats want love, right?